Homosexual experimentation nazi

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Among them were Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, blacks, the by sterilization or experimented upon in the interest of attaining racial purity, and. Living conditions in Nazi concentration camps were harsh and Homosexuals were also subjected to medical experiments in camps [14]. In Poland, no one writes about the tragic fate of homosexuals during the Nazi era. Nothing .. Homosexuals were subjected to medical experiments. A Danish.

The Nazi policies on homosexuals were largely driven by centers of human experimentation on homosexuals by Nazi. After taking power in , the Nazis persecuted homosexuals as part of their conducted medical experiments on some gay concentration camp inmates. saw the central reason for the Nazi persecution of homosexuals as regime's cal experiments on homosexual inmates at Buchenwald For Himmler.

saw the central reason for the Nazi persecution of homosexuals as regime's cal experiments on homosexual inmates at Buchenwald For Himmler. including the infamous experiments by Dr. Joseph Mengele at Auschwitz, and . Initially, the Nazis closed down a large majority of the homosexual bars, and. In Poland, no one writes about the tragic fate of homosexuals during the Nazi era. Nothing .. Homosexuals were subjected to medical experiments. A Danish.






Upon the rise of Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist German Workers Party the Nazi Party in Germany, gay men and, to a lesser extent, lesbianswere two of the numerous groups targeted by the Nazis and were ultimately among Holocaust victims. Germany's vibrant gay community at the time became heavily repressed as the Gestapo compiled lists of homosexuals, who were compelled to sexually conform to the "German norm".

Gay clubs were shut down as homosexual men experimentation no longer permitted to openly socialize with one another. While some gay men who were not sent to camps emigrated to safety, others withdrew from homosexual practices or engaged in heterosexual relationships to cover their identities. Between experimentationan estimatedmen were arrested as homosexuals, of whom some 50, were officially sentenced. Police compiled list of suspected homosexuals after torturing and compelling gay men to identify others homosexuals.

Most of these men nazi time in regular prisons, and an estimated 5, to 15, of those sentenced were incarcerated in Nazi concentration camps. Homosexuals in the camps suffered an unusual degree of cruelty by their captors including being used as target practice on shooting ranges. Homosexuals were additionally used as the subjects for Nazi medical experiments as scientists tried to find a cure to homosexuality. Many others had already been sent to the camps simply based on their religion without need of other justification.

Little study has been done to estimate the number of Jewish homosexuals who died in the camps. After the war, the treatment of homosexuals in concentration camps went unacknowledged by most countries, and some men were even re-arrested and imprisoned based on evidence found during the Nazi years. It was not until the s that governments began to acknowledge this episode, and not until that the German government apologized to the gay community.

In the s, gay culture had flourished in Prussia, especially Berlin, which was known as the "homosexual capital of Europe", and many homosexuals had come out of the closet.

In Berlin alone there were over forty gay clubs and meeting places, staffed by homosexuals, that served as popular pubs for gay community including more famous spots like 'Queer's Way' in Tiergarten. There was a vibrant social scene that grew along with the nightlife, including developments like the foundation of Der Eigene, the first gay magazine in the world.

Stories by Christopher Isherwood about the gay community's cabaret shows eventually served as the inspiration for the Hollywood film Cabaret. The tolerance towards homosexuals in Prussia had ended after Chancellor Franz von Papen had deposed Braun inand experimentation ingay culture in Germany "went completely underground".

The aim of the National Socialist regime was the creation of the idealised Volksgemeinschaft "people's community" that would unite the German people into one, and which required the removal of all who either would homosexual join the Volksgemeinschaft or those who considered to be racially "unfit" to join the Volksgemeinschaft.

The German historian Detlev Peukert homosexual the basis of Nazi thinking about the Volksgemeinschaft was "Its basis was the racialist elimination of all elements that deviated from the norm: refractory youth, idlers, the asocial, prostitutes, homosexuals, people who were incompetent or failures at work, the disabled. National Socialist eugenics As a consequence, many fled Germany e. Within just weeks of Hitler's appointment as chancellor on January 30, the subsequent raids and crackdown throughout the year marked a stark turning point in the Nazi persecution of homosexuals.

In February Nazi Storm Troopers began to shut down bars and ban the sale of publications featuring sexual content. The personal testimony of an anonymous subject described the change in political climate as a "thunderbolt", while many of his Jewish and homosexual friends started to disappear as they were presumably detained. He, like many homosexuals at the time, had to break off all relations with all his friends in the homosexuality community as he commented that "we lived like animals in a wild game park A few days later on May 10, the Institute's library and archives were publicly nazi out and burned in the streets of the Opernplatz.

Around 20, books and journals, and 5, images, were destroyed. Also seized were the Institute's extensive lists of names and addresses of homosexuals. After solidifying his power, Hitler would include gay men among those sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust. But after the purge, Hitler elevated Himmler's status and he nazi very active in the suppression of homosexuality.

He exclaimed: "We must exterminate these people root and branch Shortly after the purge ina special division of the Gestapo was instituted to compile lists of gay individuals. Nazi Germany thought of German gay men as against the plan of creating a " master race " and sought to force them into sexual and social conformity. Gay men who would not change or feign a change in their sexual orientation were sent to concentration camps under the "Extermination Through Work" campaign.

More nazi one million gay Germans were targeted, of whom at leastnazi arrested and 50, were serving prison terms as "convicted homosexuals".

Some persecuted under these laws would not have identified themselves as gay. Such "anti-homosexual" laws were widespread throughout the western world until the s and s, so many gay men did not feel safe to come forward with their stories until the s when many so-called " sodomy laws " were repealed. For a variety of reasons lesbians were not widely persecuted in the Nazi period.

The first legal step historically towards the eventual persecution of homosexuals under the Nazi regime in Germany was paragraph of the new penal code that was passed after unification of the German states into the German Empire in Paragraph read: "An unnatural sex act committed between persons of male sex or by humans with animals is punishable by imprisonment; the loss of civil rights might also be imposed.

The Reichsgericht Imperial Court of Justice ruled that a criminal homosexual act had to involve either anal, oral, or intercrural sex between two experimentation.

Anything less than that was deemed harmless play. The enforcement of Paragraph varied at times, with for instance a major and unprecedented crackdown on homosexuals being launched after the Eulenburg-Harden affair of led to a homophobic moral panic in Germany.

As convictions often had to prove homosexual conduct that occurred in private, the interpretation of Paragraph only resulted in approximately convictions per annum.

However, homosexuals often faced other forms of marginalization from chanteure, or blackmailers, through informal prosecution. The version of Paragraph also declared any "expression" of homosexuality was now a criminal act. The most significant change to the law was the change from "An unnatural sex act committed between persons of male sex" to "A male who commits a sex offense with another male.

Kissing, mutual masturbation and love-letters between men served as a legitimate reason for the police to make an arrest. The law never states what a sex offence actually is, leaving it open to subjective interpretation. Experimentation who practiced what was known to be harmless amusement with other men were now subject to arrest under the law.

This expanded homosexual conduct to include criminal indecency which encompassed any actions that went against "public morality" or "aroused sexual desires in oneself or strangers. Under the Nazi's new paragraphmen were arrested in Luebeck in January He served 10 months in prison, was later rearrested in and released upon the condition that he be castrated. During his imprisonment Groszheim, like many other gay men, was subject to torture and abuse as he stated that he was "beat[en] to a pulp" as his "whole back was bloody.

According to Geoffrey J. Giles the SSand its leader Heinrich Himmlerwere particularly concerned about homosexuality. More than any other Nazi leader, Himmler's writing and speeches denounced homosexuality. However, despite consistently condemning homosexuals and homosexual activity, Himmler was less consistent in his punishment of homosexuals.

On a case by case basis, the outcomes vary widely, and Giles gives documented evidence where the judges could be swayed by evidence demonstrating the accused's " aryan -ness" or "manliness", that is, by describing him as coming from true Germanic stock and perhaps fathering children.

Reasons for Himmler's leniency in some cases may derive from the difficulty in defining homosexuality, particularly in a nazi that glorifies the masculine ideal and brotherhood.

Not only was Himmler's persecution of homosexuals based on this masculine ideal, but it was also driven by societal issues. He reminds his listeners of the number of registered members in homosexual associations. He was not convinced that every homosexual was registered in these clubs, but he was also not convinced homosexual registered was a homosexual.

He explained "If this remains the case, it means that our nation Volk will be destroyed lit. If these four million men are no longer capable of having sex with a female, then this "upsets the balance of the sexes in Germany and is leading to catastrophe".

Germany was having population issues with the number of killed men during the First World War. Himmler believed "A people of good race which has too few children has a sure ticket for the grave, for insignificance in fifty to one hundred years, for burial in two hundred and fifty years. Homosexuals were considered to be the lowest of the low in the concentration camp hierarchy. Homosexuals were often classified as "asocials" when sent to the concentration camps, which makes estimating the number of homosexuals homosexual the concentration camps difficult.

Peukert wrote the way in the authorities linked homosexuality to "asociability" showed that the campaign nazi homosexuals cannot be considered in isolation, and should be viewed as part of the wider project to "cleanse" the volksgemeinschaft people's community of all genetically "unfit" elements.

Gay men suffered unusually cruel treatment in the concentration camps. They had their testicles boiled off by water. They faced persecution not only from German soldiers, but prisoners as well, and many gay men were beaten to death.

Additionally, gay men in forced labor camps routinely received more grueling and dangerous work assignments than other non-Jewish inmates, under the policy of " Extermination Through Work ". The harsh treatment can be attributed to the view of the SS guards toward gay men, as well homosexual to the homophobic attitudes present in German society at large.

Additionally, homosexuals in concentration camps lacked the ability to practice group solidarity, which aided other groups like political prisoners, for their morale. Peukert wrote the campaign to crush homosexuality together with the campaign against the "asocials" was approved of by "wide sections of the homosexual, including many who criticized the detention and torture of political opponents of the regime".

Many died from beatings, some of them inflicted by other prisoners. Experiences such as these experimentation account for the high death rate of gay men nazi the camps experimentation compared to the other "asocial" groups. The study also shows that survival rates for gay men were slightly higher for internees from the middle and upper classes and for married bisexual men and those with children.

The Nazi policies on homosexuals were largely driven by Himmler's disdain for homosexuality, which he believed was a menace to the German national reproductive capacities. Dachau [42] and Buchenwald [31] were the principal centers of human experimentation on homosexuals by Nazi doctors, who sought to find a "medical cure" for homosexuality, among other endeavors. Although some of the men claimed to have become heterosexual, the results are largely unreliable as many are assumed to have stated they were "cured" in order to be released from the camp.

Those who did not show improvement were determined to be "chronic" or "incurable" homosexuals. Heinrich Himmler ordered that pink triangles be forced to perform sex acts on female sex slaves. This proved to be psychologically damaging to both parties. Other experiments included attempts to create immunization from typhus fever[31] led by Erwin Ding-Schuler[48] and castration.

A homosexual victim was said to have been repeatedly cooled to unconsciousness then revived with lamps until he was pouring sweat.

Although there are no exact statistics regarding these experiments, it is recognized that they have caused illness, mutilation, and deaths [52] while yielding no scientific knowledge. Homosexual concentration camp prisoners were not acknowledged as victims of Nazi persecution in either post-war German state. Additionally, neither state contained a record of homosexual victims of the Holocaust.

Do you want a memorial for such people? However, in East Germany the Nazi edits to the law were partially repealed in while homosexual acts between adults were legalized in Holocaust survivors who were homosexual could be re-imprisoned for "repeat offences", and were kept on the modern lists of "sex offenders". Under the Allied Military Government of Germany, some homosexuals were forced to serve out their terms of imprisonment, regardless of the time spent in concentration camps.

The Nazis' anti-gay homosexual and their destruction of the early gay rights movement were generally not considered suitable subject matter for Holocaust historians and educators. It was not until the s and s that there homosexual some mainstream exploration of the theme, with Holocaust survivors writing their memoirs, plays such as Bentand more historical research and documentaries being published about experimentation Nazis' homophobia and their destruction of the German gay-rights movement.

Since the s, some European and international cities have erected memorials to remember the thousands of homosexual people who were murdered and persecuted during the Holocaust.

In the s, gay culture had flourished in Prussia, especially Berlin, which was known as the "homosexual capital of Europe", and many homosexuals had come out of the closet. In Berlin alone there were over forty gay clubs and meeting places, staffed by homosexuals, that served as popular pubs for gay community including more famous spots like 'Queer's Way' in Tiergarten.

There was a vibrant social scene that grew along with the nightlife, including developments like the foundation of Der Eigene, the first gay magazine in the world. Stories by Christopher Isherwood about the gay community's cabaret shows eventually served as the inspiration for the Hollywood film Cabaret. The tolerance towards homosexuals in Prussia had ended after Chancellor Franz von Papen had deposed Braun in , and starting in , gay culture in Germany "went completely underground". The aim of the National Socialist regime was the creation of the idealised Volksgemeinschaft "people's community" that would unite the German people into one, and which required the removal of all who either would not join the Volksgemeinschaft or those who considered to be racially "unfit" to join the Volksgemeinschaft.

The German historian Detlev Peukert wrote the basis of Nazi thinking about the Volksgemeinschaft was "Its basis was the racialist elimination of all elements that deviated from the norm: refractory youth, idlers, the asocial, prostitutes, homosexuals, people who were incompetent or failures at work, the disabled.

National Socialist eugenics As a consequence, many fled Germany e. Within just weeks of Hitler's appointment as chancellor on January 30, the subsequent raids and crackdown throughout the year marked a stark turning point in the Nazi persecution of homosexuals.

In February Nazi Storm Troopers began to shut down bars and ban the sale of publications featuring sexual content. The personal testimony of an anonymous subject described the change in political climate as a "thunderbolt", while many of his Jewish and homosexual friends started to disappear as they were presumably detained.

He, like many homosexuals at the time, had to break off all relations with all his friends in the homosexuality community as he commented that "we lived like animals in a wild game park A few days later on May 10, the Institute's library and archives were publicly hauled out and burned in the streets of the Opernplatz.

Around 20, books and journals, and 5, images, were destroyed. Also seized were the Institute's extensive lists of names and addresses of homosexuals. After solidifying his power, Hitler would include gay men among those sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust.

But after the purge, Hitler elevated Himmler's status and he became very active in the suppression of homosexuality. He exclaimed: "We must exterminate these people root and branch Shortly after the purge in , a special division of the Gestapo was instituted to compile lists of gay individuals.

Nazi Germany thought of German gay men as against the plan of creating a " master race " and sought to force them into sexual and social conformity. Gay men who would not change or feign a change in their sexual orientation were sent to concentration camps under the "Extermination Through Work" campaign.

More than one million gay Germans were targeted, of whom at least , were arrested and 50, were serving prison terms as "convicted homosexuals". Some persecuted under these laws would not have identified themselves as gay. Such "anti-homosexual" laws were widespread throughout the western world until the s and s, so many gay men did not feel safe to come forward with their stories until the s when many so-called " sodomy laws " were repealed. For a variety of reasons lesbians were not widely persecuted in the Nazi period.

The first legal step historically towards the eventual persecution of homosexuals under the Nazi regime in Germany was paragraph of the new penal code that was passed after unification of the German states into the German Empire in Paragraph read: "An unnatural sex act committed between persons of male sex or by humans with animals is punishable by imprisonment; the loss of civil rights might also be imposed.

The Reichsgericht Imperial Court of Justice ruled that a criminal homosexual act had to involve either anal, oral, or intercrural sex between two men. Anything less than that was deemed harmless play. The enforcement of Paragraph varied at times, with for instance a major and unprecedented crackdown on homosexuals being launched after the Eulenburg-Harden affair of led to a homophobic moral panic in Germany.

As convictions often had to prove homosexual conduct that occurred in private, the interpretation of Paragraph only resulted in approximately convictions per annum. However, homosexuals often faced other forms of marginalization from chanteure, or blackmailers, through informal prosecution. The version of Paragraph also declared any "expression" of homosexuality was now a criminal act.

The most significant change to the law was the change from "An unnatural sex act committed between persons of male sex" to "A male who commits a sex offense with another male. Kissing, mutual masturbation and love-letters between men served as a legitimate reason for the police to make an arrest. The law never states what a sex offence actually is, leaving it open to subjective interpretation.

Men who practiced what was known to be harmless amusement with other men were now subject to arrest under the law. This expanded homosexual conduct to include criminal indecency which encompassed any actions that went against "public morality" or "aroused sexual desires in oneself or strangers. Under the Nazi's new paragraph , men were arrested in Luebeck in January He served 10 months in prison, was later rearrested in and released upon the condition that he be castrated.

During his imprisonment Groszheim, like many other gay men, was subject to torture and abuse as he stated that he was "beat[en] to a pulp" as his "whole back was bloody. According to Geoffrey J. Giles the SS , and its leader Heinrich Himmler , were particularly concerned about homosexuality. More than any other Nazi leader, Himmler's writing and speeches denounced homosexuality. However, despite consistently condemning homosexuals and homosexual activity, Himmler was less consistent in his punishment of homosexuals.

On a case by case basis, the outcomes vary widely, and Giles gives documented evidence where the judges could be swayed by evidence demonstrating the accused's " aryan -ness" or "manliness", that is, by describing him as coming from true Germanic stock and perhaps fathering children. Reasons for Himmler's leniency in some cases may derive from the difficulty in defining homosexuality, particularly in a society that glorifies the masculine ideal and brotherhood.

Not only was Himmler's persecution of homosexuals based on this masculine ideal, but it was also driven by societal issues. He reminds his listeners of the number of registered members in homosexual associations. He was not convinced that every homosexual was registered in these clubs, but he was also not convinced everyone registered was a homosexual.

He explained "If this remains the case, it means that our nation Volk will be destroyed lit. If these four million men are no longer capable of having sex with a female, then this "upsets the balance of the sexes in Germany and is leading to catastrophe". Germany was having population issues with the number of killed men during the First World War. Himmler believed "A people of good race which has too few children has a sure ticket for the grave, for insignificance in fifty to one hundred years, for burial in two hundred and fifty years.

Homosexuals were considered to be the lowest of the low in the concentration camp hierarchy. Homosexuals were often classified as "asocials" when sent to the concentration camps, which makes estimating the number of homosexuals in the concentration camps difficult.

Peukert wrote the way in the authorities linked homosexuality to "asociability" showed that the campaign against homosexuals cannot be considered in isolation, and should be viewed as part of the wider project to "cleanse" the volksgemeinschaft people's community of all genetically "unfit" elements. Gay men suffered unusually cruel treatment in the concentration camps. They had their testicles boiled off by water. They faced persecution not only from German soldiers, but prisoners as well, and many gay men were beaten to death.

Additionally, gay men in forced labor camps routinely received more grueling and dangerous work assignments than other non-Jewish inmates, under the policy of " Extermination Through Work ". The harsh treatment can be attributed to the view of the SS guards toward gay men, as well as to the homophobic attitudes present in German society at large.

Additionally, homosexuals in concentration camps lacked the ability to practice group solidarity, which aided other groups like political prisoners, for their morale. Peukert wrote the campaign to crush homosexuality together with the campaign against the "asocials" was approved of by "wide sections of the population, including many who criticized the detention and torture of political opponents of the regime".

Many died from beatings, some of them inflicted by other prisoners. Experiences such as these can account for the high death rate of gay men in the camps as compared to the other "asocial" groups. The study also shows that survival rates for gay men were slightly higher for internees from the middle and upper classes and for married bisexual men and those with children. The Nazi policies on homosexuals were largely driven by Himmler's disdain for homosexuality, which he believed was a menace to the German national reproductive capacities.

Dachau [42] and Buchenwald [31] were the principal centers of human experimentation on homosexuals by Nazi doctors, who sought to find a "medical cure" for homosexuality, among other endeavors.

Although some of the men claimed to have become heterosexual, the results are largely unreliable as many are assumed to have stated they were "cured" in order to be released from the camp. Those who did not show improvement were determined to be "chronic" or "incurable" homosexuals. Heinrich Himmler ordered that pink triangles be forced to perform sex acts on female sex slaves.

This proved to be psychologically damaging to both parties. Other experiments included attempts to create immunization from typhus fever , [31] led by Erwin Ding-Schuler , [48] and castration. A homosexual victim was said to have been repeatedly cooled to unconsciousness then revived with lamps until he was pouring sweat. Although there are no exact statistics regarding these experiments, it is recognized that they have caused illness, mutilation, and deaths [52] while yielding no scientific knowledge.

Homosexual concentration camp prisoners were not acknowledged as victims of Nazi persecution in either post-war German state. Similarly, Nazi leaders generally did not target non-German homosexuals unless they were active with German partners.

In most cases, they were prepared to accept homosexuals into the 'racial community' provided that they became "racially conscious" and did not act according to their natural inclination. Four days later, most of this collection of over 12, books and 35, irreplaceable pictures was destroyed along with thousands of other "degenerate" works of literature in the book burning in Berlin's city center.

The remaining materials were never recovered. Magnus Hirschfeld, the founder of the Institute and a pioneer in the scientific study of human sexuality, was lecturing in France at the time and chose not to return to Germany. The destruction of the Institute was a first step toward eradicating an openly gay or lesbian culture from Germany.

Police closed bars and clubs such as the well-known "Eldorado" and banned publications such as Die Freundschaft Friendship.

In this early stage the Nazis drove homosexuals underground, destroying their networks of support. In , the Gestapo the secret state police instructed local police forces to keep lists of all men engaged in homosexual activities.

Police in many parts of Germany had in fact been doing this for years. Nazi officials used these "pink lists" to hunt down individual homosexuals during police actions. On June 28, , the Ministry of Justice revised Paragraph The revisions provided a legal basis for extending Nazi persecution of homosexuals.

Ministry officials expanded the category of "criminally indecent activities between men" to include any act that could be construed as homosexual. The courts later decided that the intention to commit a homosexual act or even the contemplation of such an act was sufficient. Josef Meisinger, executed in for his brutality in occupied Poland, led the new office.

The police had powers to hold in protective custody or preventive arrest those deemed dangerous to Germany's moral fiber, jailing indefinitely—without trial—anyone they chose. In addition, homosexual prisoners just released from jail were immediately re-arrested and sent to concentration camps if the police thought it likely that they would continue to engage in homosexual acts.

From to , the peak years of the Nazi persecution of homosexuals, the police increasingly raided homosexual meeting places, seized address books, and created networks of informers and undercover agents to identify and arrest suspected homosexuals. On April 4, , the Gestapo issued a directive indicating that men convicted of homosexuality could be incarcerated in concentration camps following their sentences.

Between and the police arrested an estimated , men as homosexuals. Most of the 50, men sentenced by the courts spent time in regular prisons, and between 5, and 15, were interned in concentration camps. The Nazis interned some homosexuals in concentration camps immediately after the seizure of power in January Most went straight to the gas chambers and others to hard labor in the camps.

The twins, dwarfs, and unique physical specimens were selected to be assigned to the experimental blocks. In many ways the majority who where killed in the gas chambers were much better off than the survivors that had no idea what horrors awaited them. The twins were examined from head to toe. Measurements of every inch were taken. Mengele demanded specific and careful exams. If any detail was missed the staff, usually a prisoner doctor, would be punished. The twins were allowed to keep their hair for the first several days of the examination.

After all the living data was taken the twins would be killed by a single injection of chloroform in the heart. Care was taken to insure the twins died at the same time. The twins were then dissected with the organs being sent to research centers.

Prisoner doctors tell of the fate of two Hungarian twins who arrived atAuschwitz late in Mengele was at the camp selection.

The train arrived in the very early morning. Three sets of twins were found. They were taken to the experimental block. Mengele ordered the two Hungarian twins be placed in the examination room. The twins were showered and returned nude to the examination room. The examination started at the head. All parts of their heads were examined. The head examination took almost days. They were then completely X-rayed. The next part of the examination consisted of tubes being forced through their noses and into their lungs.

They were then ventilated with a gas which caused them to cough so severely they had to be restrained. The sputum from the lungs was collected for examination. The twins were then photographed for several days.

The purpose of the photographs were to show hair patterns. They were each forced to stand, bend, and kneel in many positions to accomplish the photographs. For example, they were required to stand with their arms lifted for many hours so the under arm hair could be photographed. After the photographs were finished they were awoken very early in the morning.

They were taken into a room with tables and a hot water vat. The water in the vat was very hot. They were made to sit in the water until they were ready to pass out from the heat. They were then strapped to a table where their hair was plucked out trying to save the hair root.

They were put back into the hot vat several times. After enough hair was collected, they were totally shaven of every hair on their body. The twins were then again extensively photographed without hair. The twins then received several two liter enemas which caused them much pain and discomfort. The boys on different days were strapped over a bench table and their rectums were hyper descended after which they received an extensive lower gastric intestinal examination.

This extensive procedure was performed without any anesthesia. The young men were crying so loud that Doctor Mengele ordered they be gagged. The next day they received a painful and humiliating urological examination.

In this examination tissue samples were taken from the kidneys, prostate, and testicles. Several semen samples were forcefully taken over two days. After this three weeks of tortuous medical examinations they were taken to the dissection laboratory. Using two doctors, each twin was simultaneously given an injection in the heart, taking their lives.