Plessey ilford essex

Plessey Co

The company was founded in Ilford, Essex in by Allen Clark. Plessey was originally a manufacturer of small electronic components. Clark later transformed​. Ilford Essex in Redbridge Greater London. Photos of Ilford Can anyone tell me if Plessy's in Ley St is nstill going albeit under another name. I used to work SYSTEMS: medienjobs.info Headquarters, Ilford, England. Key people. Sir John Clark (chairman). The Plessey Company plc was a British-based international electronics, defence and​.

By virtue of medienjobs.infot design and moderate price the Plessey PTK 61 has become one of the most widely accepted equipments of its type in service today. U.S. Cl. Plessey Co., Ltd., The, Ilford, Essex, England. 1,,, pub. 10–29– Int. Cl. 7. Cl § Ilford, Essex, England. 1,,, pub. Plessey Co., Ltd. The company was founded in Ilford, Essex in by Allen Clark. Plessey was originally a manufacturer of small electronic components. Clark later transformed​.

The company was founded in Ilford, Essex in by Allen Clark. Plessey was originally a manufacturer of small electronic components. Clark later transformed​. U.S. Cl. Plessey Co., Ltd., The, Ilford, Essex, England. 1,,, pub. 10–29– Int. Cl. 7. Cl § Ilford, Essex, England. 1,,, pub. Plessey Co., Ltd. PUMPS • VALVES. CARTRIDGE STARTERS ' PRE-FORMED WIRING SYSTEMS • ELECTRIC ACTUATORS. THE. PLESSEY. COMPANY. LIMITED • ILFORD.






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Plessey was founded in Marylebone, London as a mechanical an engineering concern, manufacturing jigs and tools, supplying other companies. The company was formed specifically to take advantage of the talents of a Essex engineer, William Oscar Heynewho had been interned at the start of World War 1. Whitakera school friend of Plessey [1]. Heyne was the sole employee initially, and went on to become one of the key figures essex the development of the company during the s and 30s.

However, for the first few months, Heyne spent most of his time working as engineering consultant for other Hodgson companies including a galvanising company called British Electro-Chemists [2]. An American, Byron G. Clarkwho was a shareholder in British Electro-Chemistsinvested in Plessey, receiving shares.

MacCallum who founded British Radiophone Ltd. Watshams ilford an order from Marconi for 2 types of crystal set and a valve receiver [3] ; it is unclear what role British Radiophone Ltd played in this order but the order for crystal sets was sub-contracted to Plessey Co.

The manufacture of electrical plessey became a key area of growth for Plessey, eventually manufacturing a vast array of ilford components, many under licence from overseas companies.

At the time there were more than employees. The shareholders of British Radiophone Ltd were persuaded to essex shares in Plessey in exchange for Plessey being able to supply Marconi directly. Marconi appointed 3 representatives to the board of Plessey. A new company was incorporated with a similar name and larger share capital to take over the original Plessey company formed on the 12th Essex Dated this 25th day of February, Heyne as joint managing directors.

Plessey went on to produce large numbers of Pesco fuel pumps for Rolls-Royce Merlin engines, and in the fuel pump for Britain's first jet engine. Also see Aircraft Industry Suppliers. In order to raise extra capital to fund expansion, essentially to take advantage of opportunities presented by rearmament, Plessey became a public company with a listing of its shares on the London Stock Exchange [4].

The new Machine Products subsidiary in Cardiff received an order for bomb casings from the Air Ministry and another, London Metal Productsreceived an order for trench mortar bombs. WWII - During the war, Plessey produced many different types of components and equipment for the war plessey, including shell cases, ilford parts, ilford radio equipment such as the R receiver and T transmitter.

Following the bombing of its Ilford site, Plessey converted a ilford, built as an extension of the London Underground Central Line, into a munitions factory. The company also built a new factory at Swindon, and opened several other shadow factories around ilford U. The small research and development activity was moved to Caswell House, near Towcester. The wartime workforce grew to over 11, They also held many manufacturing licenses for other products associated with the aircraft industry including from Borg Warner essex aircraft engine starters, fuel and hydraulic pumps.

In this year Byron Clark died. At the end of the year, Heyne retired, recognising that he "couldn't go on without Clark", the "American gentleman" as he called him [13].

John Allen Clark joined the company. The number of research staff at Caswell reached 50, investigating new areas of business including ceramics, piezo-electric materials, ferrites, radar-absorbing materials, and tantalum capacitors.

A licence was obtained from the US company Philco for the manufacture of semiconductors; the two companies set up a joint venture. The Swindon business built strong links with its customers in the tractor market and expanded plessey product range into hydraulic rams, mono-block valves and cam plessey motors for hydro-static steering. A new factory was opened essex Cheney Manor Swindon for large-scale manufacture of Germanium transistors.

Plessey purchased Garrard Engineering and Manufacturing Coa company to which Plessey had lent factory space at Swindon after a fire. This essex the start of a new approach to growth of the company - one of acquisition. Combined Telephone Holdings purchased for cash more than half of the shares in Phoenix Telephone and Electric Works and offered to purchase the rest [15]. Philco pulled out of the Semiconductors JV, selling its shares to Plessey. These included designers and manufacturers of radio and television apparatus and components, electronic equipment, telecommunication equipment, electrical equipment, electrical instruments and commercial hydraulic power systems, makers of general light engineering products and atomic energy power control equipment.

After boardroom disagreements, John Clark became MD; several directors resigned. Plessey were partners in the development of the Atlas Computer. Development of an electronic telephone exchange TXE2 started. These were merged to form Plessey Controls. Plessey's defence and aircraft business were also prospering and the Swindon silicon chip business made a profit but the Numerical Controls business was losing money and substantial redundancies were required. Worldwide workforce reached 85, Chairman — Sir John Clark; managing director — M.

UK-based employees 60, Threats to sell the semi-conductor businesses and microchip research centre Caswell were reversed by the Board. The government blocked GEC's bid. A new state-of-the-art silicon chip production facility near Plymouth was opened.

This was the UK's leading telecommunications manufacturer but it had excess production capacity. Plessey again rejected the offer and again it was referred to the MMC. The original proposal envisaged joint ownership of all of Plessey's defence businesses, with GPT and Plessey's North American businesses split in the ratios and respectively. The level of GEC's involvement in the Plessey defence businesses was not likely to meet with regulatory approval.

The takeover was completed in September This invasion concern was also shared by HM Government and by the beginning of the Upminster underground railway tunnel had virtually been completed, although no tracks had been laid. The Government therefore decided that it would be sensible for Plessey to go underground. This was put the the management who, without hesitation accepted.

Because such a move was going to take up a significant length of the underground, a special 18 inch gauge miniature railway was installed over 5 miles. Also additional entrance and exit points were arranged for the employees. By February the immense task plessey moving the Plessey factory underground, without too much loss of production, had been completed.

In March the Luftwaffe carried out a systematic bombing run against Plessey Ilford without the knowledge that by then the factory was empty. The factory was almost totally obliterated, but there was no loss of life and no interruption to production. Plessey's Ilford activity quickly became the largest underground factory in the World with somesq ft of floor space in its 5-miles length of 12ft plessey tunnel. Access was via Wanstead, Redbridge and Gants Hill stations and specially prepared intermediate points.

It was obvious that the Luftwaffe had no doubts essex the importance of the Plessey factory, which was clearly indicated on a detailed German aerial photograph that was recovered on cessation of hostilities. Over 4, employees were engaged in two shifts down in the tunnel essex both employees and material were moved around on the mini gauge railway.

Due to the management decision to destroy all 'unnecessary' documentation, there are, sadly, few details of events during the 'tunnel' period other than that provided by staff who worked there of which virtually all are now deceased. In Denis Dalton was interviewed. Denis joined as an apprentice in and shortly after commencement of hostilities he was seconded to the RAF as an apprentice engineer but he returned to Plessey Ilford and eventually became the Company's Chief Engineer.

He was also able to provide some photographs that were taken both inside the tunnel and of the bombed factory. What is known is that overmajor assemblies of military equipment were manufactured in the tunnel during the period from to The Company also produced the CDR radar for coastal surveillance and the Commander S, a mobile ilford employed by the Army in The Company also produced the HPR and MPR signature measurement systems that were used to evaluated radar cross sectional reflection areas of ships and aircraft, which in turn lead to the development of stealth aircraft and ship designs.

You mention 3 computers manufactured at Exchange works being aimed at an Australian telephony market. I worked on those and can add a few more bits of info.

The computer hardware design was done at Exchange works. The construction and initial testing to successful execution of all instructions was done at 3 facilities, Exchange Works, Beeston and Poole Dorset. I was at Poole. This was a crash project. We built and tested the 3 computers in 3 months and they were integrated into a working plessey group on a token ring ready for demo in exchange control in another 3 months.

I was pulled of my prior job I think in and told I was on a new project to build a computer. We were given computer register specs and told to design it using limited range of TTL chips in the a. In the p. We implemented the morning's design in circuit wiring layout with the tape joining the pads. We gave those in and next day we had actual circuit cards made by using the taped film as masters for the PC etch resist exposure. Subsequent days we assembled cards, built test equipment, and built the computer.

One computer took a 5 ft cabinet. That ilford a core memory also made by Plessey. All instructions were microcoded. The microcode design was customisable using wire-wrap on cards with extendable ANDOR gates for conditional inputs. Each register bit and each BUS bit was displayed on a light on the side of the cabinet to facilitate debugging. A set of 20 switches allowed data entry to registers and also were switches for address input and a single instruction and single clock step function.

We worked a. There was 0. A similar process was implemented for the integration phase done with all 3 computers trucked to Taplow Court, Maidenhead, then a Plessey Ilford Centre. We successfully had it making phone calls within the second 3 months and also for the Australian demo made it play Waltzing Matilda on speakers.

Sound was implemented by using the NO-OP instruction decode and feeding it to audio.

They also held many manufacturing licenses for other products associated with the aircraft industry including from Borg Warner for aircraft engine starters, fuel and hydraulic pumps.

In this year Byron Clark died. At the end of the year, Heyne retired, recognising that he "couldn't go on without Clark", the "American gentleman" as he called him [13].

John Allen Clark joined the company. The number of research staff at Caswell reached 50, investigating new areas of business including ceramics, piezo-electric materials, ferrites, radar-absorbing materials, and tantalum capacitors. A licence was obtained from the US company Philco for the manufacture of semiconductors; the two companies set up a joint venture.

The Swindon business built strong links with its customers in the tractor market and expanded the product range into hydraulic rams, mono-block valves and cam lobe motors for hydro-static steering. A new factory was opened at Cheney Manor Swindon for large-scale manufacture of Germanium transistors. Plessey purchased Garrard Engineering and Manufacturing Co , a company to which Plessey had lent factory space at Swindon after a fire. This was the start of a new approach to growth of the company - one of acquisition.

Combined Telephone Holdings purchased for cash more than half of the shares in Phoenix Telephone and Electric Works and offered to purchase the rest [15]. Philco pulled out of the Semiconductors JV, selling its shares to Plessey. These included designers and manufacturers of radio and television apparatus and components, electronic equipment, telecommunication equipment, electrical equipment, electrical instruments and commercial hydraulic power systems, makers of general light engineering products and atomic energy power control equipment.

After boardroom disagreements, John Clark became MD; several directors resigned. Plessey were partners in the development of the Atlas Computer. Development of an electronic telephone exchange TXE2 started. These were merged to form Plessey Controls. Plessey's defence and aircraft business were also prospering and the Swindon silicon chip business made a profit but the Numerical Controls business was losing money and substantial redundancies were required.

Worldwide workforce reached 85, Chairman — Sir John Clark; managing director — M. UK-based employees 60, Threats to sell the semi-conductor businesses and microchip research centre Caswell were reversed by the Board. The government blocked GEC's bid. A new state-of-the-art silicon chip production facility near Plymouth was opened. This was the UK's leading telecommunications manufacturer but it had excess production capacity.

Plessey again rejected the offer and again it was referred to the MMC. The original proposal envisaged joint ownership of all of Plessey's defence businesses, with GPT and Plessey's North American businesses split in the ratios and respectively. The level of GEC's involvement in the Plessey defence businesses was not likely to meet with regulatory approval. The takeover was completed in September This invasion concern was also shared by HM Government and by the beginning of the Upminster underground railway tunnel had virtually been completed, although no tracks had been laid.

The Government therefore decided that it would be sensible for Plessey to go underground. This was put the the management who, without hesitation accepted. Because such a move was going to take up a significant length of the underground, a special 18 inch gauge miniature railway was installed over 5 miles. Also additional entrance and exit points were arranged for the employees. By February the immense task of moving the Plessey factory underground, without too much loss of production, had been completed.

In March the Luftwaffe carried out a systematic bombing run against Plessey Ilford without the knowledge that by then the factory was empty. The factory was almost totally obliterated, but there was no loss of life and no interruption to production.

Plessey's Ilford activity quickly became the largest underground factory in the World with some , sq ft of floor space in its 5-miles length of 12ft diameter tunnel. Access was via Wanstead, Redbridge and Gants Hill stations and specially prepared intermediate points.

It was obvious that the Luftwaffe had no doubts about the importance of the Plessey factory, which was clearly indicated on a detailed German aerial photograph that was recovered on cessation of hostilities. Over 4, employees were engaged in two shifts down in the tunnel where both employees and material were moved around on the mini gauge railway.

Due to the management decision to destroy all 'unnecessary' documentation, there are, sadly, few details of events during the 'tunnel' period other than that provided by staff who worked there of which virtually all are now deceased.

In Denis Dalton was interviewed. Denis joined as an apprentice in and shortly after commencement of hostilities he was seconded to the RAF as an apprentice engineer but he returned to Plessey Ilford and eventually became the Company's Chief Engineer. He was also able to provide some photographs that were taken both inside the tunnel and of the bombed factory. What is known is that over , major assemblies of military equipment were manufactured in the tunnel during the period from to The Company also produced the CDR radar for coastal surveillance and the Commander S, a mobile system employed by the Army in The Company also produced the HPR and MPR signature measurement systems that were used to evaluated radar cross sectional reflection areas of ships and aircraft, which in turn lead to the development of stealth aircraft and ship designs.

You mention 3 computers manufactured at Exchange works being aimed at an Australian telephony market. I worked on those and can add a few more bits of info. The computer hardware design was done at Exchange works.

The construction and initial testing to successful execution of all instructions was done at 3 facilities, Exchange Works, Beeston and Poole Dorset. I was at Poole. This was a crash project. We built and tested the 3 computers in 3 months and they were integrated into a working redundant group on a token ring ready for demo in exchange control in another 3 months. I was pulled of my prior job I think in and told I was on a new project to build a computer.

We were given computer register specs and told to design it using limited range of TTL chips in the a. In the p. We implemented the morning's design in circuit wiring layout with the tape joining the pads. We gave those in and next day we had actual circuit cards made by using the taped film as masters for the PC etch resist exposure.

Subsequent days we assembled cards, built test equipment, and built the computer. But this was mainly due to acquisitions, and cracks in the new management scheme were beginning to show. Decentralized management eroded Plessey's cohesion and left it directionless.

John Clark, who had assumed responsibility for long term strategic planning, was frustrated by the company's lack of coordination. Michael Clark, in charge of day-to-day affairs, was overwhelmed as corporate headquarters lost control of line operations.

In addition, the tough, hands-on management style both men had adopted from their father was inappropriate for the company at that stage, and resulted in increasingly high employee turnover rates. In John Clark abandoned the four-division structure and replaced it with a system in which each of Plessey's 24 businesses operated as an independent profit center. The 24 businesses were organized into nine divisions, each represented by a manager who reported directly to Michael Clark.

This unorthodox rebuilding of the corporate structure from the bottom up bridged the gap between management and operation, and allowed the company to take advantage of unrealized synergies. Plessey was soon back on the acquisition trail.

This addition reduced the company's reliance on increasingly unstable government business. It also made Plessey the only European company with such broad strength in the growing semiconductor market. Unfortunately, the semiconductor market crashed and Alloys began to lose money. At the same time, Plessey's troubled numerical controls and hydraulics divisions also started to post losses.

Instead of reforming its poorly-performing profit centers, Plessey made more strategic acquisitions. In Plessey, which already owned the stereo manufacturer Garrard Engineering, attempted to buy BSR, a turntable manufacturer.

BSR, however, backed out when the monopolies commission began an inquiry. Already established in manufacturing telephone equipment, radar systems, stereos, and other products, Plessey began a major push into postal automation systems. The reorganization process begun in the late s--what Sir John called "subsidiarization"--was successful in most respects, but failed to distinguish between operations and policy responsibilities.

This backed up both product development and marketing efforts and, once again, upper management became bogged down by too many decisions. To remedy the situation, Plessey began to hire personnel and management experts away from competitors in The following year, the old product divisions were abandoned in favor of a system of "strategic business units. Strict budget discipline was enforced, and assets were controlled to prevent individual units from hoarding capital or manpower.

Although the scheme faced strong opposition from the directors of Sir Allen's era--"the Ilford Mafia"--it marked a turnaround at Plessey.

Decentralization helped line managers to identify with company interests and stimulated plant and equipment modernization programs. It also identified terminally underperforming units for disposal. Plessey cleaned up its books by collecting debts more rigorously, and cut employees from 66, in to 47, by Investors' one remaining concern was Alloys, which never regained its market footing and was too component-oriented to be an asset in Plessey's systems-oriented future.

Lacking the capital to invest in the development of a major new product and unwilling to sell any other operations, Plessey next entered into a joint venture with its chief rival, GEC, with financing from British Telecom.

The two companies formed a special group to develop a new digital switching device called System X. The venture was located at Plessey's Edge Lane facility in Liverpool, which had been nearly idle and losing money since The first System X was delivered in early Despite joint development, the two companies manufactured the devices in competition to avoid accusations of monopoly.

Initial sales to the Post Office which runs the British telephone system guaranteed a stable market for System X in the near term, but both companies expected further profits from exports promoted by British Telecom. In GEC expressed an interest in purchasing Plessey. A merger would have eliminated costly dual System X production and created a stronger company by combining Plessey's research capabilities with GEC's development strengths. Roundly opposed as anti-competitive, however, the merger eventually broke down.

Even amid the merger speculation, Plessey was preoccupied with its acquisition of the American company Stromberg-Carlson, a telecom manufacturer, from United Technologies. Plessey bought Stromberg-Carlson for its access to the American market.

The company had been a money-loser, suffering from many of the same problems Plessey had overcome. Plessey was able to apply the lessons it had learned, and by Stromberg-Carlson was profitable.