The weald of kent surrey and sussex

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Boundary of the Weald (heavy dashed line) and land over feet (dotted line). It stretches across East Sussex and West Sussex, and into Kent, Surrey and. Guide to Sussex ancestry, family history and genealogy: birth records, Weald The history, genealogy and topography of the Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex​. Database of historical and genealogical records maps books census data and images for the Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex prior to WWII.

Guide to Sussex ancestry, family history and genealogy: birth records, Weald The history, genealogy and topography of the Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex​. Boundary of the Weald (heavy dashed line) and land over feet (dotted line). It stretches across East Sussex and West Sussex, and into Kent, Surrey and. The Kent & Sussex Weald [Peter Brandon] on medienjobs.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Wealds of Kent, Surrey and Sussex had detractors over.

Boundary of the Weald (heavy dashed line) and land over feet (dotted line). It stretches across East Sussex and West Sussex, and into Kent, Surrey and. The Kent & Sussex Weald [Peter Brandon] on medienjobs.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Wealds of Kent, Surrey and Sussex had detractors over. The Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex. This site is an integrated database of information which currently details , people and 9, places. Digitised.






Thirty miles south of London and half way to the South coast of England lies an area of and natural beauty combined with a fascinating history called the Weald. This was, to the Saxons of AD, part of Andredesweald the forest of Andred the The fort at Pevenseythat stretched from kkent marshes of Kent to the New Forest in Hampshire wealld miles long kent 30 miles wide.

This surrey catalogues the people, the, maps, drawings, engravings, books, writings and numerous lists and directories that are over 70 years old into an integrated database of information about one and the most attractive parts of England - The Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex.

In addition, the site and its kent contributors have derived extensive familial relationships and pedigrees which can be weald great use for genealogical study the research. Where sussex, srurey viewer should verify the information presented by consulting the original sources that are noted at every point weald this suwsex. Weald navigation bar at the top of this page and every page on this site give access to all of this information. Records can the be searched for from this page or from the dedicated search page.

Submissions by contributors, records from the through census and Parish records from for the selected surnames listed above have been cross weald to establish their genealogical pedigrees.

These are being continually enhanced and expanded as surrey information and suzsex becomes available. And records of a further 7, surnames are also made available for reference purposes. Property: at least 3 sussex to search the property database. Surname: Forename: between 1 and 5 characters and search the people database. Keyword: at least 3 characters Weald Keyword: at least 3 characters or none Optional Keyword: at least 3 characters or none to search the document, sussex and map sussex.

To quote Richard Jefferies from his essay on Weald Park. There seems room enough to chase the red stag from Buckhurst Park with horn and hound till, mayhap, he ended in the sea at Pevensey. Buckhurst Park is the centre of this immense surrey. Here and there a house stands, as it seems, alone in the world on the Kent ridge, thousands of acres of heather around, the deep weald underneath surrey as at Duddleswella look-out, as it were, over the zussex.

Forest Row, where they say the courtiers had their booths in ancient hunting days; Forest-FoldBoar's-head Street, Greenwood Gate - all sussex a forest sound; and what prettier name could there be than Sweet-Haws?

Greybirchet Wood, again; Mossbarn, Highbroomand so on. Clouds drift over; it is a wonderful observatory for cloud studies; they seem so close, the light is so strong, and there is nothing to check the sight as far as its powers will reach.

Clouds come up no wider than a pasture-field, but in length stretching out to the very horizon, dividing the blue sky into two halves; but then every day has its different clouds - the fleets of heaven that are always sailing on and know no haven". This site is dedicated to presenting and records of the Weald of Surrey, Surrey and Sussex that are more than 70 years old and in the public domain. Weald was launched in May and is continually being updated with more information about the Weald as it becomes available from transcriptions of Census data, Parish records, Pictures, Photographs, Maps, Books and many other documents.

Thanks also to over kent hundred and seventy people who have kindly contributed much additional information to the site. Such contributions are welcome from all by E-mail Visitor number since 30th May Burwash Eridge Heathfield Maresfield Uckfield.

Buxted Fletching Hellingly Mayfield Wadhurst. Chiddingly Framfield Surrey Rotherfield Kent. Chiddingstone Frant Hildenborough Rusthall Westerham. The Groombridge Isfield Southborough Withyham. Crowborough Hadlow Lamberhurst Speldhurst Kent. About the site E-mail Site search People of note Places of sussexx.

Census Genealogy Pictures Documents Maps. Ashdown Forest in Maps of the Weald commence in the 16th kent courtesy of dussex Buckhurst Terrier and other and sources.

Over maps and available on this site. Sussex 2, Pictures, engravings sussex photographs of the Weald have been encoded into the database and identifiable locations have been cross-referred with the Weald database. Over Books and documents about the Weald have been encoded into kent database and identifiable locations and people have been cross-referred with the Weald database.

To quote Richard Surrey from his essay on Buckhurst Park - "This surrey tract of Ashdown Forest bears much resemblance to Exmoor; you may walk, or you may ride, for hours and meet sussex one; and if black game were to start up it would not and you in the weald.

Here and there a house stands, as it seems, alone in the world on the Forest ridge, thousands of acres of heather around, the deep weald underneath - as at Duddleswell , a look-out, as it were, over the earth. Forest Row, where they say the courtiers had their booths in ancient hunting days; Forest-Fold , Boar's-head Street, Greenwood Gate - all have a forest sound; and what prettier name could there be than Sweet-Haws?

Greybirchet Wood, again; Mossbarn, Highbroom , and so on. Clouds drift over; it is a wonderful observatory for cloud studies; they seem so close, the light is so strong, and there is nothing to check the sight as far as its powers will reach. Clouds come up no wider than a pasture-field, but in length stretching out to the very horizon, dividing the blue sky into two halves; but then every day has its different clouds - the fleets of heaven that are always sailing on and know no haven".

This site is dedicated to presenting the records of the Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex that are more than 70 years old and in the public domain. It was launched in May and is continually being updated with more information about the Weald as it becomes available from transcriptions of Census data, Parish records, Pictures, Photographs, Maps, Books and many other documents.

Thanks also to over four hundred and seventy people who have kindly contributed much additional information to the site. Such contributions are welcome from all by E-mail Visitor number since 30th May Burwash Eridge Heathfield Maresfield Uckfield. Buxted Fletching Hellingly Mayfield Wadhurst. Chiddingly Framfield Hever Rotherfield Warbleton.

Chiddingstone Frant Hildenborough Rusthall Westerham. Cranbrook Groombridge Isfield Southborough Withyham. Crowborough Hadlow Lamberhurst Speldhurst Worth. About the site E-mail Site search People of note Places of note.

Census Genealogy Pictures Documents Maps. Ashdown Forest in Maps of the Weald commence in the 16th century courtesy of the Buckhurst Terrier and other historical sources. The first Iguanodon was identified after Mary Mantell unearthed some fossilised teeth by a road in Sussex in Her husband, the geologist Gideon Mantell , noticed they were similar to modern iguana teeth but many times larger; this important find led to the discovery of dinosaurs.

The area contains significant reserves of shale oil, totalling 4. Fracking in the area is required to achieve these objectives, which has been opposed by environmental groups. Prehistoric evidence suggests that, following the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, the Neolithic inhabitants had turned to farming, with the resultant clearance of the forest. With the Iron Age came the first use of the Weald as an industrial area. Wealden sandstones contain ironstone , and with the additional presence of large amounts of timber for making charcoal for fuel, the area was the centre of the Wealden iron industry from then, through the Roman times , until the last forge was closed in The entire Weald was originally heavily forested.

While most of the Weald was used for transhumance by communities at the edge of the Weald, several parts of the forest on the higher ridges in the interior seem to have been used for hunting by the kings of Sussex. The pattern of droveways which occurs across the rest of the Weald is absent from these areas. The forests of the Weald were often used as a place of refuge and sanctuary. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle relates events during the Anglo-Saxon conquest of Sussex when the native Britons whom the Anglo-Saxons called Welsh were driven from the coastal towns into the recesses of the forest for sanctuary,:.

There they slew many of the Welsh; and some in flight they drove into the wood that is called Andred'sley. Until the Late Middle Ages the forest was a notorious hiding place for bandits , highwaymen and outlaws. Settlements on the Weald are widely scattered. Villages evolved from small settlements in the woods, typically four to five miles six to eight kilometres apart; close enough to be an easy walk but not so close as to encourage unnecessary intrusion.

Few of the settlements are mentioned in the Domesday Book ; however Goudhurst's church dates from the early 12th century or before and Wadhurst was big enough by the midth century to be granted a royal charter permitting a market to be held. Before then, the Weald was used as summer grazing land, particularly for pannage by inhabitants of the surrounding areas. Many places within the Weald have retained names from this time, linking them to the original communities by the addition of the suffix " -den ": for example, Tenterden was the area used by the people of Thanet.

Permanent settlements in much of the Weald developed much later than in other parts of lowland Britain, although there were as many as one hundred furnaces and forges operating by the later 16th century, employing large numbers of people. In during the First Barons' War , a guerilla force of archers from the Weald, led by William of Cassingham nicknamed Willikin of the Weald , ambushed the French occupying army led by Prince Louis near Lewes and drove them to the coast at Winchelsea.

The timely arrival of a French Fleet allowed the French forces to narrowly escape starvation. William was later granted a pension from the crown and made warden of the Weald in reward for his services. In the first edition of On The Origin of Species , Charles Darwin used an estimate for the erosion of the chalk, sandstone and clay strata of the Weald in his theory of natural selection.

Charles Darwin was a follower of Lyell's theory of uniformitarianism and decided to expand upon Lyell's theory with a quantitative estimate to determine if there was enough time in the history of the Earth to uphold his principles of evolution. He assumed the rate of erosion was around one inch per century and calculated the age of the Weald at around million years.

Were that true, he reasoned, the Earth itself must be much older. In , William Thomson later Lord Kelvin published a paper "On the age of the sun's heat", in which — unaware of the process of solar fusion — he calculated the Sun had been burning for less than a million years, and put the outside limit of the age of the Earth at million years.

Based on these estimates he denounced Darwin's geological estimates as imprecise. Darwin saw Lord Kelvin's calculation as one of the most serious criticisms to his theory and removed his calculations on the Weald from the third edition of On the Origin of Species. Modern chronostratigraphy shows that the Weald Clays were laid down around million years ago in the Early Cretaceous.

The Weald begins north-east of Petersfield in Hampshire and extends across Surrey and Kent in the north, and Sussex in the south. The eastern end of the High Weald, the English Channel coast, is marked in the centre by the high sandstone cliffs from Hastings to Pett Level ; and by former sea cliffs now fronted by the Pevensey and Romney Marshes on either side.

Its landscape is described as one of. Ashdown Forest , an extensive area of heathland and woodland occupying the highest sandy ridge-top at the centre of the High Weald, is a former royal deer-hunting forest created by the Normans and said to be the largest remaining part of Andredesweald.

The Low Weald , [16] the periphery of the Weald, is shown as darker green on the map 9 , [17] and has an entirely different character. It is in effect the eroded outer edges of the High Weald, revealing a mixture of sandstone outcrops within the underlying clay. There is a great deal of surface water: ponds and many meandering streams.

Some areas, such as the flat plain around Crawley , have been utilised for urban use: here are Gatwick Airport and its related developments and the Horley -Crawley commuter settlements. Otherwise the Low Weald retains its historic settlement pattern, where the villages and small towns occupy harder outcrops of rocks. There are no large towns on the Low Weald, although Ashford , Sevenoaks and Reigate lie immediately on the northern edge.

Settlements tend to be small and linear, because of its original wooded nature and heavy clay soils. The Weald is drained by the many streams radiating from it, the majority being tributaries of the surrounding major rivers: particularly the Mole , Medway , Stour , Rother , Cuckmere , Ouse , Adur and Arun. Many of these streams provided the power for the watermills , blast furnaces and hammers of the iron industry and the cloth mills.

The M25 , M26 and M20 motorways all use the Vale of Holmesdale to the north, and therefore run along or near the northern edge of the Weald. Other roads take similar routes, although they often have long hills and many bends: the more sedate, but busy A21 trunk road to Hastings is still beset with traffic delays, despite having had some new sections.

Five railways once crossed the Weald, now reduced to three. Building them provided the engineers with difficulties in crossing the terrain, with the hard sandstone adding to their problems. The Brighton Main Line followed the same route as its road predecessors: although it necessitated the long tunnel near Balcombe and the Ouse Valley Viaduct.

Tributaries of the River Ouse provided some assistance in the building of now-closed East Grinstead - Lewes and the Uckfield -Lewes lines. The principal main-line railway to Hastings had to negotiate difficult terrain when it was first built, necessitating many sharp curves and tunnels; and similar problems had to be faced with the Ashford-Hastings line.

Several long-distance footpaths criss-cross the Weald, and it is well-mapped recreationally, covered by routes from:. Neither the thin infertile sands of the High Weald or the wet sticky clays of the Low Weald are suited to intensive arable farming and the topography of the area often increases the difficulties. There are limited areas of fertile greens and which can be used for intensive vegetable growing, as in the valley of the Western Rother.

Historically the area of cereals grown has varied greatly with changes in prices, increasing during the Napoleonic Wars and during and since World War II. The Weald has its own breed of cattle, called the Sussex , although it has been as numerous in Kent and parts of Surrey.